Owen Jennings, a former member of New Zealand Parliament and president of Federated Farmers of NZ writes about methane: "It is a part of natural cycle. It has been forever. CO2 in, Methane out, Methane oxides into CO2 and water, CO2 back in again. On and on. No new Methane, no new CO2. Same old, same old. The more Methane, the more CO2, the more grass, the more New Zealand can help feed the world and our planet gets measurably greener."

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On TheBFD, New Zealand's most widely-read blog, regular contributor Lushington Brady writes: "Astrophysicist Prof Valentina Zharkova has published a peer-reviewed paper arguing that new understanding of solar cycles suggest that the Earth is about to be plunged into an extended cooling period."

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One of our American members, Dr Thomas P Sheahen has reviewed at "WattsUpWithThat" the latest book by Danish analyst Professor Bjorn Lomborg. Tom concludes: "Lomborg has a compelling case, and he makes it quite clearly with common-sense reasoning, a grasp of numerical values, and a comfortable writing style. It contains no equations, only graphs. Everyone who is concerned about pursuing the best approach to climate change will find merit in reading this book. "

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Our American NZCSC member, Dr David Wojick posts at CFact about growing recognition of the Magna Carta Universatum 2020 issued recently by CLINTEL (Climate Intelligence Foundation) in which he states: "The climate science community ought to be more honest to the public about the severe limitations of their theoretical models."

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The climate change debate might be one of the worst cases of academic suppression in history. CLINTEL (the Climate Intelligence Foundation) has issued the Magna Carta Universitatum 2020. This short document is basically an aspirational code of conduct for freedom of inquiry and speech at universities. The first Magna Carta Universitatum was issued in 1988 and to date at least 889 universities have signed on to it. CLINTEL notes that it is building directly on this precedent, to fit “the special challenges of today”. For each of the five principles enunciated, CLINTEL cites a climate example.

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